Faculty of HS | Media Room

Press Review

Only articles published in English appear below.
For French-language articles, view the French press review »

What type of helmet is best for small children engaged in winter activities?
  • Hockey helmets best for tobogganing: study
    Ottawa Citizen, 10 other sources
    - 23/01/2012
    Dr. Michael Vassilyadi, co-author of this study led in collaboration with Professor Blaine Hoshizaki (School of Human Kinetics) says "the hockey helmet is the winner at most velocities, and then the cycling helmets for the highest."

  • Hockey helmet safest for kids on toboggans
    Winnipeg Free Press, 1 other source
    - 21/01/2012
    Safety performance was defined by the ability of a helmet to reduce acceleration of the head during the impact, said Professor Blaine Hoshizaki (School of Human Kinetics), director of the Neurotrauma Impact Laboratory.

  • So what kind of helmet should your child be wearing for winter sports?
    Dr. Karl Kabasele HQ
    - 21/01/2012
    What’s important is to choose the right helmet for the particular sport your child is participating in, make sure it meets safety standards, and make sure it fits your child’s head as it should.

  • Helmet Safety
    CBC The National
    - 20/01/2012
    VIDEO: What helmets are suitable for kids out tobogganing? The CBC's Kelly Crowe reports (interview with Professor Blaine Hoshizaki, School of Human Kinetics, at the Neurotrauma Impact Science Laboratory).

  • Helmets vary in offering protection for winter sports and play
    Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
    - 20/01/2012
    "Helmets are designed and tested to mitigate the risk of an injury; they are not designed to eliminate head injuries," said co-author Blaine Hoshizaki, of the School of Human Kinetics.

  • Ottawa lab puts children's helmets to the test
    CTV Ottawa, 1 other source
    - 20/01/2012
    A study of helmets used by children for winter activities offers some new data on the various types of head protection that would suit tobogganers.

  • Helmets for tobogganing kids get crash tests
    CBC News
    - 20/01/2012
    A Canadian study co-authored by Professor Blaine Hoshizaki (School of Human Kinetics) suggests young children should wear helmets while tobogganing, but concludes there's no clear answer about what type of headgear works best.

  • Researchers Investigate How Well Protective Headgear Works for Small Children Participating in Winter Activities
    American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS)
    - 20/01/2012
    Blaine Hoshizaki, PhD, of the School of Human Kinetics, and colleagues used a monorail drop tower to simulate the types of impact that can be sustained by a child’s head during mishaps in tobogganing.


Consolidation of the Faculty of Health Sciences under one roof on campus

  • Une faculté toujours aussi éparpillée(in French only)
    La Rotonde
    - 16/01/2012
    Luc Cormier, président de l'Association des étudiants pré-diplômés en sciences infirmières, et Andréa Paquette, étudiante de 4e année en sciences de la santé, commentent sur le fait que les étudiants de la Faculté des sciences de la santé n’ont aucun pavillon mère où se regrouper.

  • Open letter to Allan Rock
    The Fulcrum
    - 12/01/2012
    Luc Cormier, President of the Undergraduate Nursing Students' Association, addresses uOttawa President Allan Rock to reaffirm the urgent need for a new building for the students of the Faculty of Health Sciences.

  • Allan Rock précise la décision de l'Ud'O (in French only)
    Le Droit
    - 12/01/2012
    Le recteur de l'Université d'Ottawa, Allan Rock, rend réponse à l'éditorial de Pierre Jury, « Une priorité bulldozée » (Le Droit, 10 janvier) concernant la question de l'espace à l'Université.

  • No single building on the horizon for U of O health sciences students
    Ottawa Citizen - 11/01/2012
    Ottawa Citizen reporter Mark Brownlee sums up the situation of the construction of a new building for the Faculty of Health Sciences.

  • Une priorité bulldozée (in French only)
    Le Droit - 10/01/2012
    Pierre Jury, éditorialiste au quotidien Le Droit, fait l'état de la situation des appels à la construction d'un nouveau pavillon pour la Faculté des sciences de la santé, qui se « heurtent à la sourde oreille de la direction de l'Université ».

  • Des étudiants de deuxième classe en santé (in French only)
    Le Droit
    - 09/01/2012
    Luc Cormier, président de l'Association des étudiants prédiplômés en sciences infirmières, adresse une lettre ouverte à Allan Rock suite à la réponse du recteur de l'Université d'Ottawa à un article paru dans le Ottawa Citizen le 2 janvier dernier au sujet du projet de construction d'un nouveau pavillon, consacré uniquement à la Faculté des sciences de la santé, une promesse dite brisée par l'administration centrale de l'Université d'Ottawa.

  • U of O sees health sciences building as a priority, says president
    Ottawa Citizen
    - 01/05/2012
    Allan Rock, President of the University of Ottawa, and Dr. Denis Prud'homme, Dean of the Faculty of Health Sciences, comment on whether or not the plans for a single building for health sciences remains a priority for the U of O administration.

  • uOttawa health sciences dean urges new health facility
    Academica Group
    - 01/04/2012
    Dr. Denis Prud'homme, Dean of the Faculty of Health Sciences, comments on the need for a new health facility at the University.

  • Nursing Students Won't See New Building
    580 CFRA News Talk Radio
    - 01/03/2012

  • Nursing students angry as U of O backs off on vow
    Ottawa Citizen
    - 01/02/2012
    Luc Cormier, president of the nursing student association, comments on having to wait for a new health sciences building.

  • Les sciences de la santé toujours éparpillées (in French only)
    Le Droit - Cyberpresse
    - 12/12/2011
    Le doyen de la Faculté des sciences de la santé de l'uOttawa, le Dr Denis Prud'homme, digère mal la décision de l'établissement de reporter le projet de consolidation des programmes sous un même toit.

  • Les étudiants regroupés sous un même toit d'ici 2016? (in French only)
    Le Droit
    - 27/07/2011
    Éparpillés dans des édifices aux quatre coins de la ville, les étudiants en sciences de la santé de l'Université d'Ottawa pourraient se retrouver sous un même toit d'ici 2016, si l'établissement va de l'avant avec son projet de construction d'un nouveau pavillon, consacré uniquement à cette faculté.
  • Exclusif: les Sciences de la santé de l'Ud'Ottawa sous un seul toit (in French only)
    CKOI 104,7 Outaouais
    - 26/07/2011
    L'Université d'Ottawa planifie construire un pavillon de près de 80 millions $ pour regrouper ses étudiants de la faculté des Sciences de la santé.

Other news

A Little Sugar And A Human Touch Can Ease Preemies' Pain
NPR, 10 other sources
- 01/10/2012
It's time for all premature babies to be given sugar water to help them endure painful procedures says Professor Denise Harrison, School of Nursing.

The math counts: Move more, eat less
MiamiHerald.com, 2 other sources
- 01/10/2012
Professor Eric Doucet, School of Human Kinetics, provides comments in an article about exercise and weight loss.

On Fitness: Exercising for weight loss? Get accurate numbers
Thesouthern.com
- 01/03/2012
Professor Eric Doucet, School of Human Kinetics, provides comments in an article about exercise and weight loss.

Can Hockey Fights Help the Ottawa Senators Win Games?
World Book and New
s - 01/01/2012
Professor Blaine Hoshizaki, School of Human Kinetics, found that players who get punched are likely to get one of two types of concussions.

The Working Equation: Move More, Eat Less
InteliHealth, 1 more source
- 12/16/2011
Professor Eric Doucet, Faculty of Health Sciences, says that people grossly overestimate the amount of calories they burn while exercising.

How poor nations prop up Canadian health care
TheStar.com
- 12/17/2011
Professor Edward Mills, Faculty of Health Sciences, headed the study published in the British Medical Journal.

Web resource helps kidney patients eat
Metro - Edmonton, 12 other sources
- 12/12/2011
Nursing student Marie-Eve Chainey looks at a website that helps people with dietary issues related to kidney disease.

A rosy picture can let taxpayers down
The London Free Press
- 12/07/2011
Professor Norm O'Reilly, School of Human Kinetics, comments on the economic-impact estimates of any new project, attraction or event that requires taxpayer spending.

Addressing A Common Problem Breast Cancer Survivors Face
CBC Radio
- 12/06/2011
Professor Roanne Thomas, Canada Research Chair in Qualitative Health Research with Marginalized Populations, talks about the ethnodrama performance that she worked on with some breast cancer survivors.

Sports broadcasting can bring in niche fans with possibly lower revenues: experts
The Canadian Press - 12/05/2011
Professor Norm O'Reilly, School of Human Kinetics, noted that the teams such as the Leafs already have partners in CBC, Sportsnet and TSN.

Sports broadcasting can bring in niche fans with possibly lower revenues: experts
The Prince Albert Daily Herald, 43 other sources - 11/28/2011
Professor Norm O'Reilly, School of Human Kinetics, comments on the Ontario Teachers' Pension Plan's stake in Maple Leaf Sports and Entertainment.

African countries lose billions of dollars training doctors who then leave for developed nations, study says
The Medical News, 4 other sources - 11/28/2011
According to professor Edward Mills, Interdisciplinary School of Health Sciences, the brain drain of trained health workers from poorer countries to richer
ones exacerbates the problem of already weak health systems in low-income countries.

Doctor Brain Drain Costs African Countries $2 Billion Yearly
Newsy - 11/27/2011
VIDEO: According to professor Edward Mills, Interdisciplinary School of Health Sciences, the brain drain of trained health workers from poorer countries to richer ones exacerbates the problem of already weak health systems in low-income countries.

Toronto Maple Leafs To Stay In Hands Of Ontario Teachers' Pension Plan
the daily globe, 6 other sources - 11/26/2011
Professor Norm O'Reilly, School of Human Kinetics, comments on the Ontario Teachers' Pension Plan's stake in Maple Leaf Sports and Entertainment.

The true impact of concussions in the NHL
Citytv - 11/26/2011
Professor Blaine Hoshizaki, School of Human Kinetics, talks about the NHL.

Doctor brain drain costing sub-Sahara Africa $2bn
City Press - 11/26/2011
According to professor Edward Mills, Interdisciplinary School of Health Sciences, the brain drain of trained health workers from poorer countries to richer ones exacerbates the problem of already weak health systems in low-income countries.

Toronto Maple Leafs To Stay In Hands Of Ontario Teachers' Pension Plan
Huffingtonpost, 9 other sources - 11/25/2011
Professor Norm O'Reilly, School of Human Kinetics, comments on the Ontario Teachers' Pension Plan.

Doctor brain drain costs Africa $2 billion: Canadian study
Ottawa Citizen, 51 other sources - 11/25/2011
According to professor Edward Mills, Interdisciplinary School of Health Sciences, the brain drain of trained health workers from poorer countries to richer ones exacerbates the problem of already weak health systems in low-income countries.

Sub-Saharan African countries lose billions of dollars due to migration of doctors
The Medical News, 4 other sources - 11/24/2011
According to professor Edward Mills, Interdisciplinary School of Health Sciences, the brain drain of trained health workers from poorer countries to richer ones exacerbates the problem of already weak health systems in low-income countries.

U.S. private equity firm interested in Maple Leaf Sports & Entertainment
The Canadian Press - 11/23/2011
Professor Norm O'Reilly, Faculty of Health Sciences, talks about the U.S. private equity firm.

Sidney Crosby return to action
CTV Ottawa - 11/21/2011
VIDEO: Professor Thomas Blaine Hoshizaki , School of Human Kinetics, talks about Sidney Crosby’s comeback after his head injury. (On the right side of the page).

Diet and exercise only one part of the weight-loss puzzle
Times & Transcript
- 11/05/2011
Professor Jean-Philippe Chaput, School of Human Kinetics, was in Moncton to speak at a nutrition and health symposium about some of the non-traditional factors that affect a person's weight.

Playing video games causes teens to overeat, study finds
Ottawa Citizen, 4 other sources - 10/27/2011
Professor Jean-Philippe Chaput, School of Human Kinetics, compared the eating habits of teens who had spent time gaming to those of a group who simply spent time resting.

Area resident offers sincere thanks to Wheels of Hope drivers
St. Lawrence Local Community News - 10/27/2011
Article is written by professor Dawn Smith, School of Nursing.

NHL players, researchers take hard look at helmets
Standard-Examiner
- 10/12/2011
Professor Blaine Hoshizak, School of Human Kinetics, simulates in his lab the blows NHL players and their helmets absorb.

Fighting obesity
cfax
- 10/07/2011
AUDIO: Dean Denis Prud'homme, Faculty of Health Sciences, speaks about Denmark's new tax on fatty foods. (11:00)

Player safety a growing problem in NHL
Fox sports mid west
- 10/03/2011
Professor Blaine Hoshizaki , School of Human Kinetics, said that the NHL is taking steps to promote player safety but more must be done.

NHL players, researchers take hard look at helmets
San Mateo Daily Journal, 140 other sources
- 09/30/2011
Professor Blaine Hoshizaki , Faculty of Health Sciences, simulates in his lab the blows NHL players and their helmets absorb.

Eat more often, shed more pounds?
Calgary Herald, 6 other sources
- 09/22/2011
Professor Eric Doucet, School of Human Kinetics, said that eating several small meals a day won't necessarily help lose weight.

Brains of Obese May Crave High-Calorie Foods More: Study
US news, 3 other sources
- 09/19/2011
Professor Jean-Philippe Chaput, School of Human Kinetics, said the research is relevant because it provides greater understanding into how blood sugar affects eating habits.

The Truth About Exercise and Appetite
Self
- 09/10/2011
Professor Eric Doucet, School of Human Kinetics, shows through a study that, people who burned 200 calories by walking briskly thought they had burned 825.

The training mission in Haiti goes on!
Coaching Association of Canada
- 09/06/2011
Professor Diane Culver, School of Human Kinetics is leading a research project entitled: “The quality and impact of the multi-sport modules of Levels 1 and 2 of Haiti’s Programme d’état de certification des cadres sportifs.”

CFL's future has never been brighter
Ottawa Citizen, 6 other sources
- 09/05/2011
Professor Norm O'Reilly, School of Human Kinetics, says that Only Olympic hockey gets better ratings than the CFL's Grey Cup championship.

Eat more often, shed more pounds?
The Gazette, 4 other sources
- 09/01/2011
According to obesity expert Éric Doucet, School of Human Kinetics, eating six small meals a day may not show better weight-loss results compared with a traditional three-meals-a-day approach.

Race organizer battling kidney disease is Alive to Strive
Your Ottawa
- 08/11/2011
Article presents nursing student Marie-Eve Chainey, co-organiser of the Alive to Strive race.

 

Archives


July 2011

  • Friday, July 22 & Monday July 25

Ugandan HIV and AIDS patients receiving antiretroviral "cocktail" therapy can expect to live nearly as long as their compatriots who don't have HIV, a new study finds. "They can have almost a normal life expectancy, and live approximately two thirds as long as if they had not had HIV," said Edward Mills, a professor of global health at the University of Ottawa in Canada and lead author of the study. Read the article in Bay Ledger News Zone, Reuters News, Zimbio, EmpowerHER, Quality Health, The Post Chronicle, To The Center or Yahoo! News Canada »

  • Friday, July 22

Professeur Ollie Jay, School of Human Kinetics, talks about his study on body adaptation to heat during summer (at 5:35). Listen to the audio clip from Ontario Morning on CBC »

  • Wednesday, July 20

As temperatures sail into 40 degree territory, Professor Ollie Jay, who runs the thermal ergonomics lab at the University of Ottawa where he studies the effects of extreme temperatures on the body, gives tips for beating the heat. Listen to the audio clip on CBC.ca »

  • Wednesday, July 20

With City public health officials calling an extreme heat alert, Glen Kenny, a professor in the University of Ottawa’s School of Human Kinetics and an expert on the effects of physical activity in extreme heat, said heat waves are dangerous for people working outside. Dehydration can leave people feeling irritable and angry, he said. This increases injury risk for workers because heat-stressed people can’t concentrate as well on complex tasks. Read the article in The Star »

  • Wednesday, July 20

HIV patients in Africa who are receiving regular treatment can expect to live a near normal lifespan, Canadian researchers suggest in the world's first large-scale study to examine HIV patients' life expectancy on the continent. "This is astounding news for people living with HIV in Africa who had been living for several years now and were initially told to go home to plan for their deaths. It changes everything," said lead researcher Dr. Edward Mills, who is also Canada Research Chair in global health at the University of Ottawa. Read the article in Nanaimo Daily News or MD News »

  • Tuesday, July 19

Since their advent in the mid-1990s, powerful antiretroviral therapies have radically improved the life expectancy of HIV-infected patients in the developed world. Now, research suggests that when made affordable and accessible, the same drug cocktails are equally effective for African patients. "Effective therapies, provided in a simplified and decentralized manner, can offer very favorable treatment effects in the African context," said study co-author Edward J. Mills, the Canada Research Chair in Global Health at the University of Ottawa. Read the article in MSN Health, Health on the Net Foundation, Bio-Medicine, Times Colonist, Canada.com, The Ottawa Citizen, Global News, The Province, Windsor Star, Edmonton Journal, Vancouver Sun, Calgary Herald, Montreal Gazette, dose.ca, The Star Phoenix, Health.com, US News Health, Yahoo! News India, Nanaimo Daily News, Ottawa Citizen or The Globe and Mail »

  • Thursday, July 14

Nursing student Marie-Eve Chainey has decided to spread the word and help others suffering with kidney disease accomplish their dreams by gaining a greater level of fitness. This past February, she co-founded Alive to Strive Kidney Fitness Project, a non-profit organization aiming to further kidney health through advocacy, education and grants projects. The first annual Fresenius Alive to Strive Race will take place on Aug. 14 at the Terry Fox Athletic Facility on Riverside Drive. Read the article in The Ottawa Citizen »

  • Thursday, July 14

Visionary leadership in business is rarely defined in good times. More often it becomes apparent during times of uncertainty. Uncertainty requires a leader to adapt, examine closely the strengths and weaknesses of the organization, look to the future and make the hard decisions. Visionary leadership often involves a break with the past, recognizing that the world has changed and that survival or future growth requires embracing change. The National Hockey League is at such a crossroads. Read the Op-Ed by Professor Norm O'Reilly, PhD, of the School of Human Kinetics, in The Gazette »

  • Sunday, July 3

Professor Ollie Jay, PhD, of the School of Human Kinetics, and his colleagues at the University of Ottawa’s Thermal Ergogenics Laboratory tested eight volunteers in mid-May and again in early September, measuring physiological variables during a 90-minute bike ride at 22 C. Despite a hot, muggy summer in Ottawa, the volunteers didn’t show any of the typical signs of heat acclimatization – higher sweat rate, more blood flow to the skin, lower core temperature and heart rate – in the second trial. In other words, you don’t slow down because your body has reached some critical temperature. Instead, your brain slows you down to prevent you from ever reaching that critical temperature. Read the article in The Globe and Mail »

June 2011

  • Sunday, June 26

Over two nights, Professor Patrick O'Byrne, PhD, from the School of Nursing at the Faculty of Health Sciences, surveyed mostly affluent, 40-something couples mingle in the lounge area of a local swingers’ club. Many surveyed by O’Byrne practised unprotected sex, had multiple partners and failed to undergo regular testing, a well-established recipe for spreading sexually transmitted infections (STIs), said the study just published in the Canadian Journal of Nursing Research. Read the article in The Ottawa Citizen.

  • Thursday, June 16

Mine temperatures can reach 40°C and significantly affect miners’ health, as well as their productivity. That’s why Natural Resources Canada’s (NRCan’s) CANMET Mining and Mineral Sciences Laboratories (MMSL), in partnership with the University of Ottawa’s School of Human Kinetics, is working with industry for the Deep Mining Research Consortium (DMRC) to find and reduce the particular causes of heat stress in miners. Heat stress mitigation is much more than a health and safety issue, it also causes the mine’s ventilation infrastructure to operate at high levels of capacity and increases the costs associated with refrigeration systems. Read NRCan's Natural Elements Newsletter.

  • Wednesday, June 15

Joé Juneau, founder of the Nunavik Youth Hockey Development Program, received an honorary doctorate June 14 from the Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa during its afternoon convocation ceremonies at the Ottawa’s National Arts Centre. Juneau, a former NHL player, played on the silver medal-winning 1992 Canadian Olympic team and in five Stanley Cup finals. Read more in Nunatsiaq Online.

  • Wednesday, June 15

Emerging research shows that handwriting increases brain activity, hones fine motor skills, and can predict a child's academic success in ways that keyboarding can't. Occupational therapist Katya Feder, an adjunct professor at the University of Ottawa School of Rehabilitation, explains one benefit: handwriting aids memory. If you write yourself a list or a note — then lose it — you're much more likely to remember what you wrote than if you just tried to memorize it. Learn about all of the benefits of gripping and moving a pen or pencil by reading the article in The Los Angeles Times.

  • Tueday, June 14

Caesarian section rates have risen sharply in Sarnia over the past eight years, but that trend may soon change with the introduction of epidurals, a local obstetrician says. Dr. Sharon Rutledge, who is also a gynecologist, said some patients in Sarnia have opted for surgical births when pain medication wasn't adequate. Author Esther Shoemaker, a PhD candidate at the University of Ottawa, argues more health-care providers are recommending C-sections to patients. Canada's health care system, she says, could save $25 million if the rate of first-time C-sections was reduced to 15% — the World Health Organization recommendation. Read the article in The Petrolia Topic.

  • Sunday, June 12

Dr. Freedhoff and Robert Ross, the director of the Centre for Obesity Research and Education at Queen’s University, argued for diet and exercise, respectively, at the “forks v. feet” debate at the University of Ottawa (which you can watch at http://bit.ly/mluJBQ). But this wasn’t a clash between burger-and-beer scarfing exercise junkies and gym-phobic calorie counters. In fact, it’s increasingly clear that the two factors can’t be separated, as a new long-term study of more than 100,000 runners reveals. Read the article in The Globe and Mail.

  • Thursday, June 9

A large 12-year study found that people were more likely to die during the follow-up if they spent most of the day sitting, regardless of how much exercise they got. Travis Saunders, certified exercise physiologist and PhD candidate in the school of human kinetics at the University of Ottawa proposes simple steps for those who often work sitting: "Take a two- to three-minute break to stretch every hour; walk to co-workers’ desks instead of calling or emailing them; take the stairs." Read the article in NOW Magazine.

  • Thursday, June 2

The NHL has even taken over marketing efforts from team departments as hundreds of accredited media members gather to cover the Vancouver-Boston series. Norm O'Reilly, a professor of sport marketing at the University of Ottawa, said top teams draw substantially less of their total revenue from ticket sales than they do from all other sources. Read the article in The Vancouver Sun.

  • Thursday, June 2

The transaction to bring the Thrashers to Winnipeg is valued at $170-million, with $60-million of that a relocation fee the new owners will be paying to the league. The result is a price tag on the franchise itself of about $110-million. “There are certainly cases right now across the league where franchise values have plummeted but, really, franchise value is a mutually exclusive thing,” University of Ottawa sports management associate professor Norm O’Reilly said.  “It really depends.” Read the full article in The Globe and Mail.

May 2011

  • Thursday, May 26

It is standard practice in mental-health centres and prisons countrywide, but two leading Canadian academics say using behaviour modification -rewards or punishment designed to encourage good behaviour -on killers, pedophiles and other mentally ill offenders is both unethical and ineffective.Such programs treat violent psychiatric patients "like children" and ignore the socioeconomic, political and environmental factors that landed them in trouble, argues an unusual critique co-authored by the vice-dean of health sciences at the University of Ottawa. Read the article in The National Post.

  • Wednesday, May 25

At the 2011 Canadian Sponsorship Forum, Professor Norm O'Reilly, PhD, from the School of Human Kinetics, will present the results of the fifth annual Canadian Sponsorship Landscape Study with his U of O colleague and research partner, Professor Benoit Seguin, PhD.  Learn more about Professor Norm O'Reilly and his study on the Canadian Sponsorship Forum website.

  • Saturday, May 21

Canadian billionaire David Thomson's love of hockey runs deep, but as a minority investor in the company in talks to buy the NHL's Atlanta Thrashers and move them to Winnipeg, he isn't one to put his passion for the game ahead of a smart business decision, a long-time friend says. Norm O'Reilly, a sports business professor at the University of Ottawa, suggested that Winnipeg will be a difficult market for a team in the long term, especially if the Canadian dollar weakens again. Read the article in The Winnipeg Free Press.

  • Thursday, May 12

The HIV/AIDS epidemic has taken a particular toll on low- and middle-income countries (LIMC), with sub-Saharan Africa heavily affected by both disease and poverty. Among the many challenges faced by clinicians and AIDS organizations are maintaining health in the face of poverty that may preclude access to food and medication adherence. In his recent research article, Edward J. Mills, from the Interdisciplinary School of Health Sciences, and colleagues, presents the association between livelihood security and adherence to antiretroviral therapy. Read the article on PLoS ONE.

  • Monday, May 9

Yoni Freedhoff, a family doctor and founder of Ottawa's Bariatric Medical Institute, talks about how he will have the honour and pleasure of debating Queen's Dr. Bob Ross on whether or not it's been forks or feet that have led us to where we are with obesity in society, and which deserves more of our attention on our way out at an event organized in part by Zach Ferraro, PhD candidate under Dean Prud'homme and Chair of the Canadian Obesity Network's Student and New Professionals division. Read the post on Weightly Matters.

  • Monday, May 9

Professor Audrey Giles, PhD, from the School of Human Kinetics, and her therapy dog 'Tundra' guided a small group of dog owners at Brewer Park to participate in one of the Jane's Walks held throughout Ottawa on May 7. Watch the video at OttawaCitizen.com.

Also in The Ottawa citizen,

Professor Audrey Giles, School of Human Kinetics, comments on the problem of dog waste for a city. Read more »

An article mentions professor Audrey Giles, School of Human Kinetics, and her involvement in the Jane’s Walk Ottawa festival, in particular the homelessness part of Jane's Walk which highlights how homeless people live life in Ottawa. Read more »

  • Saturday, May 7

Health-care service providers and politicians looking to cut health-care costs might want to consider taking a scalpel to the number of caesarean sections performed each year without medical reason, according to an article published by the Canadian Health Services Research Foundation. Canada's caesarean section rate is at about 27 per cent, says Ivy Lynn Bourgeault, a researcher at the University of Ottawa whose PhD student, Esther Shoemaker, wrote the article. Read the article in The Edmonton Journal.

  • Thursday, May 5

In Canadian hockey, currency fluctuations can be almost as important as player skills. When the Canadian dollar, or loonie, began approaching parity with the U.S. dollar in late 2007, fans in Winnipeg and Québec City were thrilled. Financial constraints (along with a lack of owner interest) had driven the Winnipeg Jets to Phoenix in 1996 and the Québec Nordiques to Denver in 1995. But many now believe that the loonie’s rise has opened the way for a return of National Hockey League (NHL) franchises to both cities. Read Professor Norm O'Reilly's article in Americas Quarterly.

  • Thursday, May 5

Universal newborn hearing screening improves quality of life in children aged 3–5 years but does not show a clear relationship with spoken language skills. Read the article by Andrée Durieux-Smith, Ph.D., FCAHS, Founding Director of the Master’s Program in Audiology/Speech-Language Pathology (1993) and Emeritus Professor in the Faculty of Health Sciences and Elizabeth Fitzpatrick, Ph.D., Assistant Professor in audiology in the School of Rehabilitation Sciences, in Evidence-Based Medicine.

  • Wednesday, May 4

At first glance, the Garnier FindingLife Expedition to Africa seems small scale. Elia Saikaly, founder of FindingLife, and his team, Norm O’Reilly (professor and researcher in sport management), Élise Desjardins (master’s student) and Francesca Trentadue (undergraduate student) from the School of Human Kinetics , are on a 20-day trip that started April 21. They’ll help build a classroom in Solio, Kenya, pair up with Kenyan students, climb a mountain and travel through the countryside. To give the campaign broader reach, the trip is broadcast to thousands of people in North America. “I think the big picture here is we’re supporting this community here called Solio,” Saikaly said just after summiting Mount Kenya. “But the big idea is that it’s a whole community of kids supporting kids.” Read the article on Mashable.com.

 

  • Monday, May 2

Adolescents have been identified as a high-risk group for poor adherence to and defaulting from combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) care. However, data on outcomes for adolescents on cART in resource-limited settings remain scarce. This study by Professor Edward J. Mills, from the Interdisciplinary School of Health Sciences, and colleagues, is the largest assessment of adolescents receiving cART in Africa. Read the research article on PLoS ONE.

April 2011

  • Tuesday, April 26

Elia Saikaly, founder of FindingLife, talks about how hundreds of Ottawa school kids are participating at the Louis Riel High School Soccer Dome on Bearbrook drive in an interactive soccer tournament simultaneously with kids in Kenya, broadcast live over the Internet on big screens so the kids can interact from continent to continent between games. Listen to the CFRA podcast at about 8:20.

  • Tuesday, April 26

Ottawa soccer players kicked off their day at the Louis Riel Soccer Dome by sharing their warm up in a rock concert atmosphere simultaneously with hundreds of fellow competitors in Africa seen on Giant Screens and broadcast live from Kenya via the Internet. Steve Desroches, Deputy Mayor, opened the FindingLife event with welcome greetings to the kids participating in this event and to introduce his Excellency, Simon Nabukwesi, the Kenyan High Commissioner to Canada who voiced Kenya's appreciation and encouraged Kids in both countries to continue to strive to reach their goals. Read the Deputy Mayor's blog entry.

  • Tuesday, April 26

Expedition Africa: Students in Ottawa will play a virtual soccer game with kids in Kenya, as part of Expedition Africa. View the 'A' Morning video.

  • Tuesday, April 26

Elia Saikaly, the founder of FindingLife, had recognized the extraordinary ability of a soccer game to draw together complete strangers from different countries, cultures and backgrounds. That is why he put together this special occasion where local students interacted between Africa and Canada while playing soccer in both continents, linking it with the Garnier FindingLife Expedition to Africa. Read the article in The Ottawa Citizen or watch their video coverage.

  • Sunday, April 24

Some exercise experts believe that exercise has a positive effect on weight loss because of this increased metabolic rate. But, others dispute these claims, stating that the exercise after-burn effect is just a myth and that metabolic rates drop back to normal within minutes after exercise ends. Glenn Kenny, a professor in the School of Human Kinetics at the University of Ottawa, thinks it has more to do with the cardiovascular system. He has come to think you feel hot because the the body has a hard time getting rid of the extra heat it produces during exercise. But even though you feel hot, you’re not burning extra calories and so you’re not going to lose more weight. Read the article in The Richmond Register.

  • Tuesday, April 19

Osteoarthritis is one of the most disabling and painful conditions attributable (in part) to excess weight. Once established, osteoarthritis significantly reduces quality of life and mobility, often precipitating further weight gain and posing an important barrier to weight management. A panel of experts (The Ottawa Panel) has now released a comprehensive set of evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for the management of osteoarthritis in overweight and obese patients, published in Physical Therapy.

  • Saturday, April 16

Human Kinetics student Rachel Homan led 5-4 heading into the eighth and final end of the GP Car and Home Players' Championship without hammer, but after a great clearing shot by Jones' third Kaitlyn Lawes, Homan, facing at least four counters, made a freeze to force the Winnipeg skipper to try to punch out that stone for the win. Read the article in The Ottawa Sun.

  • Friday, April 15

Human kinetics students Élise Desjardins and Francesca Trentadue are headed to Kenya, Africa where they will build classrooms, climb Mount Kenya, and carry out research as part of the Garnier FindingLife Expedition to Africa. Watch them talk about the trip with Elia Saikaly, the founder of FindingLife, on Rogers Daytime.

  • Tuesday, April 12

Elia Saikaly, the founder of FindingLife, talks about the upcoming Garnier FindingLife Expedition to Africa with Rima Sanaallah, one of the six students from Ottawa-area high schools taking part in the expedition, on Canada AM. The video is featured in CTV News' Top Picks.

  • Monday, April 4

With some star NHL players off the ice and in the headlines recently due to serious concussive head injuries, the research of Blaine Hoshizaki is also making news. Dr. Hoshizaki, director of the Neurotrauma Impact Science Lab at the University of Ottawa, and his team of researchers are working to improve helmets to protect athletes against concussion and to develop standards that will help organizations and manufacturers better evaluate and certify protective headgear. Read the article in University Affairs.

  • Friday, April 1

Witnessing the the stomach-churning hit that sent Max Pacioretty of the Montreal Canadiens slamming headfirst into a post during an NHL game on March 8 recreated in the isolation of a lab makes it all the more disturbing to watch. But for Professor Blaine Hoshizaki from the School of Human Kinetics, the goal is scientific. His team is determined to understand the relationship between brain injuries such as concussions, helmet performance, and the risky hits that hockey players give and take during a game—and to find out whether equipment should be improved or whether certain hits should be banned in the future. Read the article in Maclean's.

  • Friday, April 1

The new dean of the Trent-Fleming School of Nursing, effective July 1, is Kirsten Woodend. She served as the director and associate dean of the School of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Ottawa until last summer. Read the article in The Peterborough Examiner.

March 2011

  • Monday, March 28

Scientific evidence confirms that exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months decreases the frequency and severity of respiratory illnesses, ear infections, diarrhea, low iron stores and anemia. Breastfeeding potentially provides protection from Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, insulin-dependent diabetes, some cancers and allergic diseases. Recent research also suggests that breastfeeding results in lower rates of obesity. We are used to hearing this mantra. What we do not hear is its logical inverse -that artificial feeding with formula results in higher rates of all these conditions. Read the Op-Ed written by Nicole Smith, a fourth-year nursing student at the Faculty of Health Sciences, in The Ottawa Citizen.

  • Friday, March 25

The debate over the heavy hit on Max Pacioretty of the Montreal Canadiens took a fascinating twist recently when Air Canada threatened to pull its sponsorship of the National Hockey League. This isn’t just about the future of hockey and sponsorship – it also tells us a lot about modern marketing and communications and how social media empowers its audience. Read the Op-Ed co-written by Norm O’Reilly, a professor of sports management at the University of Ottawa on CTV News and in The Globe and Mail.

  • Tuesday, March 22

In recent years, it’s become harder and harder to excuse fits of rage and chronic lapses of judgment as simply “old-time hockey”. Still, without Sidney Crosby’s concussion problems, would the issue of head shots even be on the table? “I don’t think it’s just this one incident. It’s been building for a long time,” says Norm O’Reilly, a professor of sports management at the University of Ottawa. Read the article in Maclean's.

  • Saturday, March 19

In The Ottawa Citizen's Winner's circle : Faculty of Health Sciences student Isabelle Bond won the senior women’s patterns in 4th-6th dan and helped Canada to second in team patterns. Read the article.

  • Friday, March 18

The raging debate over the hit on Max Pacioretty of the Montreal Canadiens took a fascinating twist last week when Air Canada threatened to pull its sponsorship of the NHL. This matters not only to the future of hockey and the future of sponsorship. It also tells us a lot about modern marketing and communications, and how social media empowers the audience. Norman O'Reilly, a professor in the School of Human Kinetics at the University of Ottawa and David Finch, a professor in the Bissett School of Business, Mount Royal University, Calgary comment on concussions, sponsorship and the empowered fan in this Op-Ed featured in The Edmonton Journal.

  • Thursday, March 10

In the wake of Air Canada's threat to pull its sponsorship from the NHL, Norm O’Reilly, a professor at the School of Human Kinetics who specializes in sports marketing, said companies must evaluate whether their core customers would be more likely to value their association with the sport, or be more upset about issues such as head injuries. Read the article in The Globe and Mail.

  • Thursday, March 10

The hit that reached the halls of Parliament is ricocheting around Canada's advertising community after the Air Canada's AC.B-T chief executive officer ordered up a letter that demanded the National Hockey League end its passive stance toward player safety, backed by a threat that the airline would pull its sponsorship unless the NHL took measures to protect its players. “From a marketing perspective, it’s all about images that each potential consumer has in their mind,” said Norm O'Reilly, Professor in the School of Human Kinetics (sports marketing). Read the article in CTV News.

  • Thursday, March 10

Professor Blaine Hoshizaki from the School of Human Kinetics comments on the devastating hit that sent Montreal Canadiens forward Max Pacioretty to hospital with a cracked vertebra and a a severe concussion. Read the article on CTV.ca and watch the video "Canada AM: Dr. Blaine Hoshizaki on the injury".

  • Thursday, March 10

Her face was splashed across national TV all week long during the 2011 Scotties Tournament of Hearts, as School of Human Kinetics student Rachel Homan stole a big chunk of the spotlight with her run at the Canadian women’s curling championships. Read the article featured in The Gazette.

  • Tuesday, March 1

Faculty of Health Sciences launches Nutrition Month ! Listen to professors France Rioux, PhD and Bénédicte Fontaine-Bisson, PhD from the Program in Nutrition Sciences launch Nutrition Month on Radio-Canada.

 

February 2011

  • Monday, February 28

The last two concussions that left Sydney Crsoby out of the game since January have amplified the debate about head injuries. Philippe Rousseau, PhD candidate in human kinetics and one of the young scientists at the University of Ottawa's elite Neurotrauma Impact Science Laboratory takes part in the debate on RelieF. Watch the video (in French only).

  • Monday, February 28

Demand for foreigners to work as live-in caregivers for seniors in Canada is growing, but while some see the program as a potential answer to the needs of a rapidly aging society, others say it's rife with problems and inherently exploitative. Professor Ivy-Lynn Bourgeault, PhD, co-author of a newly published study examining Canada's Live-In Caregiver Program says live-in caregivers of the elderly face issues those caring for children do not. Read the article published in The Ottawa Citizen. Read the article published in The Vancouver Sun.

  • Saturday, February 26

Rachel Homan, a Faculty of Health Sciences student in the School of Human Kinetics, and her curling teammates have played confidently throughout the Scotties Tournament of Hearts. Read the article posted on TSN.com. Read the article published in The Toronto Sun.

  • Friday, February 25

Learn more about Ontario's curling team, including team captain Rachel Homan, a student in the School of Human Kinetics.

  • Thrusday, February 24

As part of the first Hockey Safety Summit, an event held by Reebok-CCM Hockey and the University of Ottawa’s Neurotrauma Impact Science Laboratory featuring representatives from various leagues, including the National Hockey League, Hockey Canada and the academic world, concussion experts called for action on the No. 1 hockey injury. Read the article published in The Globe and Mail.

  • Wednesday, February 23

Scientists can’t peer into the brains of hockey players the instant they get a concussion, so University of Ottawa researcher Blaine Hoshizaki does the next best thing. Read the article published in The Globe and Mail.

  • Wednesday, February 23

On the eve of his presentation to Canada's first hockey safety summit in Ottawa Wednesday, Blaine Hoshizaki, director of the Neurotrauma Impact Science Laboratory at the University of Ottawa, told the National Post's Sarah Boesveld why he's calling for a total redesign of the standardized hockey helmet and for a few key rule changes.

  • Thursday, February 17

Professor Blaine Hoshizaki, PhD from the School of Human Kinetics at the Faculty of Health Sciences and his team of young scientists at the University of Ottawa's elite Neurotrauma Impact Science Laboratory are reconstructing hard hockey hits in order to gain a better understanding of the impact of these types of head injuries. "We really don't know how successful or how safe the helmets being used today are," said lead researcher Blaine Hoshizaki, Professor in the School of Human Kinetics at the Faculty of Health Sciences. Watch the video and read the article on CTV News.

  • Thursday, February 4

The Dean of the Faculty of Health Sciences, Dr. Denis Prud'homme chats about obesity prevention and treatment with Daniel Mathieu, host of the radiocast Le Monde selon Mathieu. Listen to the interview on Radio-Canada (90,7 FM).

  • Thursday, February 3

Professor Michelle Fortier, Ph.D. in the Faculty of Health Sciences' School of Human Kinetics, comments on why so many of us are unmotivated and what it takes to get us moving. “Everybody has the motivation,” she says. “It just needs to be elicited.” Read the article entitled "What does it take to get us off the couch?" in The Ottawa Citizen.

January 2011

  • Sunday, January 30

FindingLife is a non-profit organization that combines adventure, technology, film and charitable initiatives to inspire others to find their most meaningful life and spark positive change.This year, they are headed to Kenya, Africa where they will build classrooms, climb Mount Kenya, and carry out research so others can do similar things. Norm O’Reilly, Ph.D., professor in the School of Human Kinetics, is joining the team and supporting the new adventure. Watch Elia Saikaly, the founder of FindingLife, talk about the trip on CTV News.

  • Friday, January 28

Only 15 per cent of Canadian adults are achieving the ideal two and a half hours of physical activity per week, according to recent Statistics Canada findings. The study also finds fewer women than men achieving ideal level of physical activity. In an article on the Canadian University Press newswire, Audrey Giles, professor in the School of Human Kinetics at the Faculty of Health sciences, suggests certain factors could lend to this gender divide. Read the article.

  • Thursday, January 27

The Gazette speaks to the uOttawa athletes who took home the hardware at the Ottawa Sports Awards, including Marie-Eve Chainey, a nursing student in the Fauclty of Health Sciences. Read the article.

  • Monday, January 17

Penny Werthner, associate professor in the School of Human Kinetics at the Faculty of Health Sciences, has been named among the Most Influential Women (MIW) List for 2010. The Canadian Association for the Advancement of Women and Sport and Physical Activity (CAAWS) MIW List aims to highlight the leadership, strength and accomplishments of Canadian women who made a significant impact in sport and physical activity in 2010.

  • Thursday, January 13

Over the past decade, the number of live-in foreign caregivers entering Canada has increased by 400 per cent. The International Organization for Migration, which members include Ivy-Lynn Bourgeault, PhD, Full Professor in the Interdisciplinary School of Health Sciences, looks at four western democracies — Canada, the United States, Britain and Ireland — to see how they are dealing with the changing face of elder care. Download their report or read the article in The Toronto Star.

  • Thursday, January 13

French-language graduate studies in the health field available through CNFS and the University of Ottawa: an initiative that improves healthcare services for Francophone communities. Applications are currently being accepted for French-language Masters and PhDs in health-related programs qualifying for support from the Consortium national de formation en santé (CNFS) at the University of Ottawa.

  • Thursday, January 6

It was disappointment for Canada's World Junior hockey team after they gave up a three goal lead to fall 5-3 to Russia. Many are now wondering if too much pressure is being placed on Canada's young players. Penny Werthner, PhD, sports psychologist and associate professor in the School of Human Kinetics comments. Watch the video "CTV Ottawa: Catherine Lathem on the outcome".

  • Thursday, January 6

Day 4 of the CTV News series Toronto 2061 imagines what Toronto sports will look like in 50 years. Norm O'Reilly, PhD, Associate Professor of Sport Business in the School of Human Kinetics imagines how fans might follow their favourite teams. Watch the video.

 

December 2010

  • Friday, December 30

Shirley Post, a former professor at the School of Nursing, was appointed as Member to the Order of Canada (C.M.) for her contributions to improved health care for children. Read the article in the Peterborough Examiner.

  • Sunday, December 12

In an Ottawa Citizen article exposing how more and more infertile Canadians are seeking fertility services abroad that would carry fines of up to $500,000 and 10 years in jail at home, Raywat Deonandan, Ph.D., Assistant Professor in the Interdisciplinary School of Health Sciences, says the use of Indian surrogates by Canadian couples is raising many ethical questions.

  • Thursday, December 2

Meet nursing student Marie-Eve Chainey: despite almost dying from kidney failure nine years ago and now needing dialysis every day, she excels as a high jumper with the Gee-Gees track and field team. Read the article in the Gazette.

 

October 2010

  • Saturday, October 23

Recent concern over football head injuries prompted the National Organizing Committee for Standards of Athletic Equipment to convene its top officials and outside experts to analyze possible changes in its helmet testing standards. In a New York Times article, Vice-Dean of Faculty Affairs in the Faculty of Health Sciences, explains that: “The mechanism relating to concussion injuries are well enough understood to be addressed in test standards. Advanced three-dimensional input methods need to be developed to be incorporated in future testing protocols.” Read the article.

  • Thursday, October 21

Blaine Hoshizaki, Vice-Dean of Faculty Affairs in the Faculty of Health Sciences, is quoted in a New York Times blog entry on the Mayo Clinic’s conference on hockey concussions where several recommendations to reduce head trauma in the sport were presented. He says: "We’ve got to make people understand that the hockey helmet is only one factor in decreasing risk of concussion". Read the article.

  • Thursday, October 21

Member of the Canadian Obesity Network, Dr Denis Prud'homme, dean of the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Ottawa talks about the relationship between physical activity and obesity. He also discusses menopause and its link to obesity. Watch the video.

  • Thursday, October 14

On CTV's Canada AM television program, Blaine Hoshizaki, Vice-Dean of Faculty Affairs in the Faculty of Health Sciences and a researcher at the University of Ottawa's Neurotrauma Impact Laboratory explains how a new football helmet he helped develop, the Xenith X1, offers unparalleled three-dimensional protection, dispersing the impact over a greater area. Read the article.

  • Tuesday, October 12

A Globe and Mail article explains how a sponsored research agreement between Ferrara’s Xenith start-up company and the University of Ottawa led to the creation of a lab and a project aimed at creating a safer football helmet. Blaine Hoshizaki, Vice-Dean of Faculty Affairs in the Faculty of Health Sciences, explains how the helmet was created. Before joining the university in 2004, Hoshizaki had been vice-president of research and development for Bauer, designing helmets for the hockey manufacturer, and later for CCM. Read the article.

 

September 2010

  • Wednesday, September 29

Norm O’Reilly, associate professor at the School of Human Kinetics was invited, in July, to participate in a series of reports (“Why not Canada?”) studying the possibility of the addition of an NHL franchise in Canada on TSN. He was also quoted in two articles, the Globe&Mail and Le Devoir regarding the construction of an arena in Québec city to bring back an NHL team. Professor O’Reilly is an expert in sport management, specializing in sport business.

  • Monday, September 27

In a Macleans article entitled: "Boomers are far less fit than their parents were", assistant professor at the School of Human Kinetics, Bradley Young talks about his research on Masters athletes. Read the article.

  • Wednesday, September 14

In a Globe and Mail article, Matias Golob, PhD student at the School of Human Kinetics and owner of Body Advantage bridges the fitness gap between researcher and practitioner by pairing kinesiologists with older adults to diversify the workout experience. Read the article.

  • Friday, September 8

In a CBCNews.ca article, Marie-Eve Chainey, a student at the School of Nursing in the Faculty of Health Sciences, and 20 other patients in Ottawa say having a hemodialysis machine at home has given them back control over their lives and want to be reimbursed for their hydro and water costs. Read the article.

 

August 2010

  • Monday, August 2

Marie-Eve Chainey, a student at the School of Nursing in the Faculty of Health Sciences, returns to elite competition after a nine-year battle with kidney disease that nearly killed her several times and forced her to endure some 800 blood transfusions. Read the article on thestar.com.

  • Wednesday, August 4

In an interview with Rogers Ottawa, Marie-Eve Chainey, a student at the School of Nursing in the Faculty of Health Sciences, explains that the formation of a new new group Improving Patient Advocacy in Chronic Renal Disease (ImPACKD), the CKD community will finally get a voice to address issues surrounding kidney disease.Watch the video.

  • August

Assistant professor Bradley Young from our School of Human Kinetics recently participated in the ‘Canada 55+ Games’ as keynote speaker on his SSHRC and Sport Canada-funded research pertaining to Masters and Seniors Sport. Professor Young discussed the growing phenomenon of sport for middle-aged and older adults, and discussed various motives that propel these people to engage in sport. Participants, organizers and local media heard Professor Young on how aged sport participation might change broader society’s conceptions of what is possible for people as they grow older. Professor Young’s graduate students were on hand to conduct their research during the event that attracted close to1600 athletes participating in 23 event. Read the article.

 

July 2010

  • Thursday, July 29

Following the article published in the Globe and Mail, Pr Audrey Giles, explains in a CBC Toronto interview, why new immigrants face greater risks of drowning than the other parts of the Canadian poplation and what should be done to lessen those risks. See also the article published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal

  • Wednesday, July 28

In a CBC interview, Patrick O'Byrne, professor at the School of Nursing, disagrees with the general approach of charging people criminally for not disclosing their HIV status, and its consequences with the spreading of the virus. Listen to the interview.

  • Thursday, July 15

In a Globe and Mail article about the greater risks of drowning faced by new immigrants, Pr Audrey Giles from the School of Human Kinetics explains what should be done to lessen the risks for this particular part of Canadian population. Read the article.

  • Wednesday, July 14

Heidi Sveistrup, professor in the  School of Rehabilitation Sciences at the Faculty of Health Sciences has been using virtual reality as an intervention for rehabilitation with children and adolescents with cerebral palsy and adults post stroke and traumatic brain injury for over 7 years. Her work, along with researchers of McGill University, recently appeared on the gamefvd site.

 

June 2010

  • Friday, June 11

Dawn Stacey was interviewed by the Canadian Health Services Research Foundation for a special newsletter focusing on health care organizations that are “making the patient part of the health care team”. Pr. Stacey described her research on patient decision aids, which present the pros and cons of various health options in an interactive way, to help patients make better decisions.

  • Thursday, June 3

Christabelle Sethna, professor in the Faculty of Social Sciences and in the Interdisciplinary School of Health Sciences takes part in a talk show entitled "a half century with the pill" (watch the video) and is interviewed in an article published in the Globe and Mail about the same subject.